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Jim O'Reilly

The All-SSD Array: A Study in IOPS Overkill

Jim O'Reilly
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JohnVerity
JohnVerity
1/27/2013 3:59:24 PM
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Re: Storage waiting on CPU?
Yes, we've written a bit about 10GE. It should shake things up, and then some.

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JimOReilly
JimOReilly
1/19/2013 12:42:16 PM
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Re: Storage waiting on CPU?
@John, That' a good comment. The whole OS storage stack needs a rethink to meet the speed.

Networking is next. 10GE will be standard on mobos by year end.

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JohnVerity
JohnVerity
1/18/2013 8:49:19 PM
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Storage waiting on CPU?
It's amazing that I/O rates can now outstrip the CPU's ability to deal with all the data. A real switcheroo from the old days, when CPUs waited and waited for disk, or at least turned their attention to other matters while the storage system went through its relatively slo-mo routines.

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JimOReilly
JimOReilly
1/16/2013 11:49:01 AM
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Re: Hybrid is best
It will be interesting to see if Micron, Sandisk and Samsung look like WD, Seagate and HGST in 10 years time. I think we are just moving out of the early adopter phase of SSD products. The smaller pioneers will be swallowed by the bigger flash comapnies over the next 3 years, and flash volumes will begin to grow rapidly as more production capacity comes on stream, price per GB falls relative to HDD, and the wear problem lessens.

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JohnVerity
JohnVerity
1/16/2013 11:09:35 AM
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Re: Hybrid is best
Leapfrog!

I woke up today wondering why the advent of flash has created a new storage giant, another EMC, for instance, which came out of nowhere and usurped Big Blue. (To a great extent, anyway.) Maybe it's early days. Perhaps there's not idle, lazy whale left for a bunch of sharks to attack. Perhaps there are no new interfaces open to define. Every established storage system maker can simply weave in some SSD and be done with it. 

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JimOReilly
JimOReilly
1/15/2013 1:10:06 PM
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Re: Hybrid is best
To clarify, we are talking price per gigabyte at 10%. It will move around a bit. Micron just announced price reductions that bring the ratio down a bit, but new HDD will increase capacity and offset that. I can see this going on for a while, until either HDD runs out of steam, or flash is replaced by memristors or whatever.

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JohnVerity
JohnVerity
1/15/2013 12:38:13 PM
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Re: Hybrid is best
Interesting, I didn't realize that price differential would hold for so long. I will have to keep that in mind in my travels. 

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JimOReilly
JimOReilly
1/14/2013 11:54:31 AM
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Re: Best practice for SSD
@toby, that's a good point. Small databases point to memcachedb as a way to safely store them with low overhead. But these are small files generally, and also only a small percentage are cluster global (transactions IDs and recovery points for instance), so a big fast array is maybe overkill.

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toby
toby
1/14/2013 11:28:43 AM
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Best practice for SSD
@Jim: I would have thought using these types of array for things like caching AD tables and other system wide access data would make the most sense. After that, caching all that stuff in the big databases that is a headache, like indexes, would also be a wise move that makes good use of the technology.

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JimOReilly
JimOReilly
1/13/2013 9:54:27 PM
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Re: Hybrid is best
We'll see hard drives at 10% the price of SSD for at least 5 more years. That'll be enough to keep them around. But even bulk drives get phased out when they are too slow.

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